Martha Stewart to join marijuana grower Canopy Growth

“I am delighted to establish this partnership with Canopy Growth and share with them the knowledge I have gained after years of experience in the subject of living,” said Stewart. “I’m especially looking forward to our first collaboration together, which will offer sensible products for people’s beloved pets.”

The collaboration comes as Canada’s major cannabis producers scramble to secure market share in the nascent U.S. and Canadian markets. Demand for marijuana and THC products has skyrocketed in Canada following its decision to legalize recreational use in October, leading to supply shortages across the country.

Interest in CBD, or cannabidiol, is already booming. That will likely only increase as more recognizable brands introduce their own CBD products into the market. Although companies are prohibited by the Food and Drug Administration from adding CBD to food, beverages and dietary supplements in the U.S., many are doing so anyway.

For weed growers, partnerships with iconic names like Stewart are key to building consumer trust. Even though people are becoming more comfortable with cannabis, there’s still some taboo they’ll need to overcome. And that’s where celebrity partnerships and joint ventures come in handy. Tilray, another Canada-based pot grower, recently collaborated with Authentic Brands to develop cannabis-infused foot creams, cosmetics and other consumer products.

“As soon as you hear the name Martha, you know exactly who we’re talking about,” said Bruce Linton, Canopy Growth chairman and co-CEO. “Martha is one of a kind and I am so excited to be able to work alongside this icon to sharpen our CBD product offerings across categories from human to animal.”

For Canopy, Stewart’s name graces hundreds of products at more than a dozen retailers. One can buy Martha Stewart shoes at Aerosoles, Martha Stewart organization products at Staples, Martha Stewart roses at BloomsyBox and a Martha Stewart rolled and stuffed hampshire porchetta roast at Pat LaFrieda Meat Purveyors, to name a few.

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