St. Louis tops nation in STD rate after error

 In Health
ST. LOUIS, MO — The Gateway to the West continues the streak of leading the nation in the sexually transmitted disease rate.  It was reported in September that  Etowah County in Northeast Alabama displaced St. Louis.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Alabama health department just released new statistics after an error was discovered.   The new numbers put St. Louis back at the top of the list.

An expert tells the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that a new surveillance system contributed to the error.  It incorrectly reported that in every 24 people had in Etowah County.  That would have been triple the rate in St. Louis.

In 2016, Americans were infected with more than 2 million new cases of gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia, the highest number of these sexually transmitted diseases ever reported, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.

“Clearly we need to reverse this disturbing trend,” said Dr. Gail Bolan, director of CDC’s Division of STD Prevention. “The CDC cannot do this alone and we need every community in America to be aware that this risk is out there and help educate their citizens on how to avoid it.”

The agency’s annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report shows that more than 1.6 million of the new cases were from chlamydia, 470,000 were from gonorrhea and nearly 28,000 cases were of primary and secondary syphilis. Secondary syphilis is the most contagious form of the disease, according to the CDC. While all of these can be cured by antibiotics, many people go undiagnosed and untreated.

Only those three STDs are required by law to be reported to the CDC by physicians. When you include HIV, herpes and more of the dozens of diseases which can be transmitted sexually but which are not tracked, the CDC estimates there are more than 20 million new cases of STDs in the United States each year. At least half occur in young people ages 15 to 24.

“STDs are out of control with enormous health implications for Americans,” said David Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors. The coalition represents state, local and territorial health departments who focus on preventing STDs.

“If not treated, gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis can have serious consequences, such as infertility, neurological issues, and an increased risk for HIV,” said Harvey.

Common STDs

The most common STD is chlamydia. It’s caused by the bacteria chlamydia trachomatis, and like most STDs, is easily transmitted by all forms of sexual activity — oral, vaginal or anal — as well as during childbirth. Chlamydia is known as a “silent” infection, because most people have no symptoms, which means it often goes untreated. In women, it can ultimately cause pelvic inflammatory disease that can scar and affect fertility. In men, it can cause testicular pain and swelling.

Gonorrhea is another bacterial STD that can be silent, but often displays symptoms such as burning during urination and vaginal or penile discharge. If caught anally, it can create itching, bleeding and painful bowel movements. If not treated, gonorrhea can cause severe and permanent health problems, including long-term pain and infertility.

Syphilis is the most serious bacterial STD. Left untreated, syphilis can affect the brain, heart and other organs of the body, ultimately leading to death. It’s called the “Great Pretender,” because the symptoms of syphilis which include rashes and chancres, or sores, fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, headaches, muscles aches and fatigue, mimic other diseases. As the disease progresses, the symptoms go away, and progress silently to it’s most deadly stage.

At one point, the United States had all but eliminated syphilis, turning it into a “disease of the past,” said Bolan.

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